University Students Respond to "Hard To Believe"

(Image: Clemson University Falun Dafa club)

(Image: Clemson University Falun Dafa club)

"Hard To Believe" was screened this Monday (Nov. 16) at Clemson University in South Carolina, attracting many students, as well as campus and local media coverage. 

(Image: Clemson University Falun Dafa club)

(Image: Clemson University Falun Dafa club)

Many students were moved by the film, and said they gained a deeper understanding about China's political environment, media situation, and the victims' struggle to get the information out of China to seek help from the West.  

One student watched the film as an outside assignment to their unrelated studies and offered to share their inspiring report with our blog: 

•  Briefly describe the film/event in enough detail to show me that you were there paying attention including the discussion period.

    - This film was a documentary intended to raise awareness about the harvesting of organs in China. The US has turned a blind eye to the atrocity that is taking place across the sea. The Falun Gong are subjected to constant fear of being taken into custody by the government, or worse, harvested for their organs. They are subjected to torture and physical examinations. The curious thing is, they do not see the exams are the most important aspect. But to those that know the truth, this is a test to see if they are acceptable patients to be harvested. The government is making millions off of “illegally” harvested organs, which they are taking from living, and non-consentual prisoners. The oppression these people are facing could be considered the least of their worries. 

The oppression these people are facing could be considered the least of their worries.
— A student who watched Hard To Believe

•  Briefly describe your response/reaction to the film/event.  Did you like it?  Was it boring, exhilarating, etc?  Be honest.  You will not be penalized for not liking it.

    - This film was enlightening, and engaging. I had no idea about the problem that was occurring in China. I was completely unaware of the current situation. The film filled me with, what I believe to be, unbiased information, while also sparking my interest and concerning me to the point that I wished to be involved in the action taking place. 

This film was enlightening, and engaging. The film filled me with, what I believe to be, unbiased information, while also sparking my interest”
— Clemson University Student


•  Describe two points of information that you received during the film/event/discussion that are of educational value to you. 

    -  Organ harvesting is a very real, and serious matter. It is inhumane and unethical, no matter how you look at it. These prisoners are not vicious, they simply practice a different method, seen as taboo to the Chinese government. 
    -  I also got an insight into a communist way of life. I have been sheltered from this type of government. The speaker spoke about how the government controls all media, and can make you believe what they see most fitting, not always what is true. They control social networking, further spreading their belief system, and condemning all others. 

I also got an insight into a communist way of life. I have been sheltered from this type of government.”
— A student who watched Hard To Believe

•  Relate the film to one or more of the following topical themes of the course: Environment, Population, Culture, Economy, Politics. 

     -  Culture: Falun Gong is a belief system that is highly opposed by the Chinese government. Because of this opposition, the followers are persecuted, tortured, and executed. No actual crime is being committed, only a different way of thinking. These people are non-violent participants. 
     -  Politics: China is a communist country. This allows them to control the media, thus controlling the beliefs of those who do not choose to get their own information. They force feed it’s citizens with false accusations with little to no reliability or supporting information. This allows them to maintain control. 
     -  Politics: Other governments are hesitant to get involved, in what is a seemingly obvious and disgusting practice. The US began involvement, but were cut short. We must work together to raise awareness and put an end to this atrocity. It is essentially genocide, yet it has little to no media coverage.
    -  Population: The population is pitted against each other. Humanity is now at stake. Even though these people know about the horrors that take place, citizens are still reporting each other for practicing Falon gong. 

We must work together to raise awareness and put an end to this atrocity.
It is essentially genocide, yet it has little to no media coverage.
— A student who watched Hard To Believe

•  Relate the event to one or more particular (parts of a) country in a particular world region.  Be specific.  What and how does the film inform us about this place(s)? 

    -  China: This film is based out of China. The “crimes” being committed are in China. The Chinese government is harvesting their citizens for their organs in order to turn a profit. This display of communistic rule was new to me. It was unheard of in a democratic society.
    -  US: The US began to get involved, but was soon cut short of their goal. The Chinese people are trying to raise awareness in order to receive help from one of the Global superpowers. Without our input, the Chinese government will be able to continue practicing this unethical and inhumane procedure. 
    -  Israel: The Israeli government has made it illegal to get transplants in China without proper documentation.  This came as a result of a doctor noticing a seemingly impossible appointment for a heart transplant. 

Without our input, the Chinese government will be able to continue practicing this unethical and inhumane procedure.
— A student who watched Hard To Believe